physio dublin2

All posts tagged physio dublin2

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Exercising while Pregnant.

 

Pregnancy is a unique period of a woman’s life, where lifestyle behaviours, including physical activity can significantly affect your health, as well as that of the fetus. It can be a challenging time to be active and many women are unsure of what is recommended in terms of exercise when expecting. Although guidelines around the world recommend women without contraindications engage in prenatal physical activity, fewer than 15% of women will actually achieve the minimum recommendation of 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity during their pregnancy.

 

The key recommendations from the 2019 Canadian guidelines for physical activity throughout pregnancy are:

1: All women without contraindications should be physically active throughout pregnancy.

2: Pregnant women should accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity each week to achieve clinically meaningful health benefits and reductions in pregnancy complication.

3: Physical activity should be accumulated over a minimum of 3 days per week, however, being active every day is encouraged.

4: Pregnant women should incorporate a variety of aerobic and resistance training.

5: Pelvic Floor muscle training may be performed on a daily basis to reduce the risk of urinary incontinence. Instruction on the proper technique is recommended to obtain optimal benefits.

6: Pregnant woman who experience light-headedness, nausea or feel unwell when they exercise flat on their back should change and avoid this position.

 

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Peak PhysioExercising while Pregnant.

10 Thing’s You Didn’t Know About Tennis Elbow

10 things you didn’t know about Tennis Elbow

  1. The condition was initially described in 1873. The name “lawn tennis elbow” first came into use for the condition in 1882.
  2. Around 2 % of the population aged 30-50 will present with these symptoms.
  3. It is not just tennis players, Tennis Elbow is also known as Lateral Epicondylitis or Lateral Elbow Tendinopathy
  4. Our lateral elbow anatomy is made up of a number of components, the key component we have to assess when looking at Tennis elbow is our common wrist extensors. They create a broad tendon that inserts on the outside of the lower part of the humerus.
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Peak Physio10 Thing’s You Didn’t Know About Tennis Elbow

What Is My Rotator Cuff & Why Is It Important?

What is the rotator cuff?

The shoulder is the the most unstable joint in the body and comprises by 3 main parts the glenoid, the humerus and the scapula (shoulder blade). The shoulder joint is stabilised by several structures; ligaments, capsule and the tendons of the rotator cuff. The rotator cuff is made up of 4 muscles, SUPRAPINATUS, INFRASPINATUS, TERES MINOR and SUBSCAPULARIS. These muscles work together to rotate the arm inwards and outwards and also work to take the arm away from the body to the side. These muscles can be injured in several ways with repetitive movements, trauma, muscular imbalance or adaptive postures.

In anatomy, the scapula (plural scapulae or scapulas)

Why is it important?

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Peak PhysioWhat Is My Rotator Cuff & Why Is It Important?
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Tips to Improve your Physical Health at Work

Feeling achy, sore and tired after a day’s work?

Many of us spend most of our working day sitting at a desk. Working full time that means nearly 2000 hours a year at your desk! Two in three Irish adults are not getting enough activity to maximise the benefits for their health. Results from the Irish Society of Chartered Physiotherapists in their World Physiotherapy day survey suggest that 18-24 year olds may be the least physically active amongst all adults, spending up to 5 hours a day in front of a screen!

What can you do to improve your physical health at work?

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EoinTips to Improve your Physical Health at Work
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Are Your Bum(Gluts) Muscles Important In Cycling?

 

This is a must read for all you avid cyclists!

Having previously talked about the importance of the gluteal (bum) muscles. Now I’m going to look at this from the aspect of cycling, during the initial phase of cycling (12-4 o’clock) the glutes were an important muscle group for generating power, and by improving one’s ability to deliberately activate these muscles and improve their strength/power, one could reduce quadriceps (thigh) fatigue and improve cycling power output and performance.  Frustratingly having looked extensively over the past week for some body of QUALITY research that would back up these ideas, I have found it a fruitless task.

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EoinAre Your Bum(Gluts) Muscles Important In Cycling?
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Do You Suffer From Lower Back Pain?

 

What should you do if you suffer from lower back pain?

  • Get it checked out by a medical professional to make sure it’s nothing serious (physio, doctor, osteo etc.)
  • Short-term physiotherapy interventions can be very useful in the acute stage of lower back pain.
  • Exercise has the best evidence behind it for lowering pain levels at 3 and 6 months.
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EoinDo You Suffer From Lower Back Pain?
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Does My Bum Look Big In This?

For many years, that question has been a stalwart presence in the national psyche. But more recently, there has been a paradigm shift towards developing the all too neglected
buttock muscles.

The main buttock muscles are the Gluteals; Gluteus Minimus,Gluteus Medius and Gluteus Maximus. These muscles are of vital importance to the biomechanics of a well-functioning
body.

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EoinDoes My Bum Look Big In This?