physiotherapy dublin 4

All posts tagged physiotherapy dublin 4

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Exercising while Pregnant.

 

Pregnancy is a unique period of a woman’s life, where lifestyle behaviours, including physical activity can significantly affect your health, as well as that of the fetus. It can be a challenging time to be active and many women are unsure of what is recommended in terms of exercise when expecting. Although guidelines around the world recommend women without contraindications engage in prenatal physical activity, fewer than 15% of women will actually achieve the minimum recommendation of 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity during their pregnancy.

 

The key recommendations from the 2019 Canadian guidelines for physical activity throughout pregnancy are:

1: All women without contraindications should be physically active throughout pregnancy.

2: Pregnant women should accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity each week to achieve clinically meaningful health benefits and reductions in pregnancy complication.

3: Physical activity should be accumulated over a minimum of 3 days per week, however, being active every day is encouraged.

4: Pregnant women should incorporate a variety of aerobic and resistance training.

5: Pelvic Floor muscle training may be performed on a daily basis to reduce the risk of urinary incontinence. Instruction on the proper technique is recommended to obtain optimal benefits.

6: Pregnant woman who experience light-headedness, nausea or feel unwell when they exercise flat on their back should change and avoid this position.

 

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Peak PhysioExercising while Pregnant.

Achilles Tendinopathy – a common running injury

Running is an excellent way to get fit! However, sometimes when we start a new program we can feel little niggles beginning to arise. Achilles tendinopathy is a common injury among runners, especially those who are increasing their training load.

What is the achilles?

The achilles tendon is the biggest and strongest tendon in the body located in the back of the lower leg. The tendon has the capacity to resist large forces. It stems from the calf muscles (the gastrocnemius and soleus) and inserts into the heel of our foot (the calcaneus).

What is Achilles Tendinopathy?

A tendinopathy is a disorder which can happen when there is disrepair and disorganisation within the tendon structure. This can happen when there is excessive load placed on the structure, for example if someone starts running and increases their mileage too quickly.

The effects of overuse, poor circulation, lack of flexibility, gender, and hormonal factors can lead to tendinopathies. The structure of the tendon is disturbed by repetitive strain, causing inflammation. This cumulative microtrauma weakens the tendon, which ultimately leads to tendinopathy, especially if recovery is not allowed.

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Peak PhysioAchilles Tendinopathy – a common running injury
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Are Your Bum(Gluts) Muscles Important In Cycling?

 

This is a must read for all you avid cyclists!

Having previously talked about the importance of the gluteal (bum) muscles. Now I’m going to look at this from the aspect of cycling, during the initial phase of cycling (12-4 o’clock) the glutes were an important muscle group for generating power, and by improving one’s ability to deliberately activate these muscles and improve their strength/power, one could reduce quadriceps (thigh) fatigue and improve cycling power output and performance.  Frustratingly having looked extensively over the past week for some body of QUALITY research that would back up these ideas, I have found it a fruitless task.

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EoinAre Your Bum(Gluts) Muscles Important In Cycling?
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Concussion

Concussion

Laura Bhreathnach May 2017

I recently attended the Safe Rugby level 2 first aid course at the Aviva stadium. This updated my knowledge on the management of concussion, spinal injuries and general sports first aid. These skills will help me deliver a high standard of care at Peak physiotherapy. Something that kept coming up on this course was the poor understanding and management of concussion across the country. Therefore I thought it would be helpful to provide some information on the management and symptoms of concussion.

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EoinConcussion
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Mindfulness

Mindfulness

 Mindfulness seems to be a buzzword nowadays.  Truth be told it is a concept that has been around for centuries. In our current world, we are more distracted than ever with social media and the internet taking over the majority of our lives. We lose focus on basic things like our breathing, our thoughts and feelings.

Mindfulness is based our the principle of being present when doing a specific task.  This could relate to being aware of eating when you are ACTUALLY eating. Thinking about the  taste, texture, smell in a relaxed and patient manner. The opposite is obviously shovelling enough food down our throats and hope that you wont be hungry by the time you get your next break or are interrupted by family or work colleagues.

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EoinMindfulness
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Tendinopathy in Sports

Tendinopathies are a common source of pain in athletes. However for coaches and patients it can be difficult to understand and acknowledge in training and competitions. They develop over the course of preseason where the intensity of the training is increased. Stereo-typically athletes experience an aching tendon or region at the start of a session, ease off once the tissue is warmed up and then a dull ache the next day for 24hours, slightly more than normally. If the ache in question is worse for greater than 48hours, the sporting activity is likely too much for the tissue at that time and a rehab plan should be started.

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EoinTendinopathy in Sports