Injuries

10 Thing’s You Didn’t Know About Tennis Elbow

10 things you didn’t know about Tennis Elbow

  1. The condition was initially described in 1873. The name “lawn tennis elbow” first came into use for the condition in 1882.
  2. Around 2 % of the population aged 30-50 will present with these symptoms.
  3. It is not just tennis players, Tennis Elbow is also known as Lateral Epicondylitis or Lateral Elbow Tendinopathy
  4. Our lateral elbow anatomy is made up of a number of components, the key component we have to assess when looking at Tennis elbow is our common wrist extensors. They create a broad tendon that inserts on the outside of the lower part of the humerus.
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Peak Physio10 Thing’s You Didn’t Know About Tennis Elbow

Achilles Tendinopathy – a common running injury

Running is an excellent way to get fit! However, sometimes when we start a new program we can feel little niggles beginning to arise. Achilles tendinopathy is a common injury among runners, especially those who are increasing their training load.

What is the achilles?

The achilles tendon is the biggest and strongest tendon in the body located in the back of the lower leg. The tendon has the capacity to resist large forces. It stems from the calf muscles (the gastrocnemius and soleus) and inserts into the heel of our foot (the calcaneus).

What is Achilles Tendinopathy?

A tendinopathy is a disorder which can happen when there is disrepair and disorganisation within the tendon structure. This can happen when there is excessive load placed on the structure, for example if someone starts running and increases their mileage too quickly.

The effects of overuse, poor circulation, lack of flexibility, gender, and hormonal factors can lead to tendinopathies. The structure of the tendon is disturbed by repetitive strain, causing inflammation. This cumulative microtrauma weakens the tendon, which ultimately leads to tendinopathy, especially if recovery is not allowed.

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Peak PhysioAchilles Tendinopathy – a common running injury
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Why should I get a Deep Tissue Massage?

When it comes to hands on skills Chartered Physiotherapist are highly trained in the area. We are trained in the specific manual techniques which will work deeper into the tight tissue thus giving the best results.

Deep tissue massage focuses on getting into the deeper layers of Muscle,Fascia and Connective tissue. Often these structure can be tight and inhibited causing either pain or restriction in joint.

Massage is very effective in releasing inhibited muscles, preventing injuries, and helping the body to recover from tough training or competitions. It is also very effective in helping with chronic problems, such as back and neck pain.


Benefits of Deep Tissue Massage

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Peak PhysioWhy should I get a Deep Tissue Massage?

What Is My Rotator Cuff & Why Is It Important?

What is the rotator cuff?

The shoulder is the the most unstable joint in the body and comprises by 3 main parts the glenoid, the humerus and the scapula (shoulder blade). The shoulder joint is stabilised by several structures; ligaments, capsule and the tendons of the rotator cuff. The rotator cuff is made up of 4 muscles, SUPRAPINATUS, INFRASPINATUS, TERES MINOR and SUBSCAPULARIS. These muscles work together to rotate the arm inwards and outwards and also work to take the arm away from the body to the side. These muscles can be injured in several ways with repetitive movements, trauma, muscular imbalance or adaptive postures.

In anatomy, the scapula (plural scapulae or scapulas)

Why is it important?

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Peak PhysioWhat Is My Rotator Cuff & Why Is It Important?
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GAA 15 Injury Prevention Programme

 

With the football All-Ireland approaching this weekend, lets have a look at injury prevention in GAA. Regardless of what type of exercise you are doing, be yoga or tennis, it’s important to get a good warm up especially for injury prevention.

There has been a big focus on injury prevention in GAA in the recent years, due to the high levels of injuries. Research from the National GAA Injury Database reported that:

  • Two-thirds of players get injured and 1/3 have more than one injury in any season. One quarter of injuries are recurrences of existing or old injuries
  • Over 75% of these injuries are lower limb injuries.
  • Approximately ⅔ of these injuries are non-contact related i.e. sprinting, landing, twisting, plant/cut movements.

With these injuries and mechanisms of injuries in mind, the GAA Medical, Scientific and Welfare Committee in conjunction with UCD Physiotherapy Department, created the “GAA 15”.

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Peak PhysioGAA 15 Injury Prevention Programme
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Knee Osteoarthritis: Do I need an operation?

What Is Osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis, commonly known as wear-and-tear, is a condition in which the natural cushioning between joints, the cartilage, becomes worn. When this happens, the bones of the joints rub more closely against one another with less of the shock-absorbing benefits of cartilage. The rubbing results in pain, swelling, stiffness, decreased mobility and, sometimes, the formation of bone spurs.

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Peak PhysioKnee Osteoarthritis: Do I need an operation?
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What is dry needling?

What is Dry Needling?

Myofascial trigger point dry needling is a technique used to release myofascial trigger points. It involves the insertion of sterile single use acupuncture needles into the muscle to target a trigger point. This causes a local twitch response, the muscle contracts and relaxes. This causes a chemical response which helps to inhibit the pain/inflammatory cycle.

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EoinWhat is dry needling?
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Tips to Improve your Physical Health at Work

Feeling achy, sore and tired after a day’s work?

Many of us spend most of our working day sitting at a desk. Working full time that means nearly 2000 hours a year at your desk! Two in three Irish adults are not getting enough activity to maximise the benefits for their health. Results from the Irish Society of Chartered Physiotherapists in their World Physiotherapy day survey suggest that 18-24 year olds may be the least physically active amongst all adults, spending up to 5 hours a day in front of a screen!

What can you do to improve your physical health at work?

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EoinTips to Improve your Physical Health at Work
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Are Your Bum(Gluts) Muscles Important In Cycling?

 

This is a must read for all you avid cyclists!

Having previously talked about the importance of the gluteal (bum) muscles. Now I’m going to look at this from the aspect of cycling, during the initial phase of cycling (12-4 o’clock) the glutes were an important muscle group for generating power, and by improving one’s ability to deliberately activate these muscles and improve their strength/power, one could reduce quadriceps (thigh) fatigue and improve cycling power output and performance.  Frustratingly having looked extensively over the past week for some body of QUALITY research that would back up these ideas, I have found it a fruitless task.

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EoinAre Your Bum(Gluts) Muscles Important In Cycling?