flexibility

All posts tagged flexibility

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Exercising while Pregnant.

 

Pregnancy is a unique period of a woman’s life, where lifestyle behaviours, including physical activity can significantly affect your health, as well as that of the fetus. It can be a challenging time to be active and many women are unsure of what is recommended in terms of exercise when expecting. Although guidelines around the world recommend women without contraindications engage in prenatal physical activity, fewer than 15% of women will actually achieve the minimum recommendation of 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity during their pregnancy.

 

The key recommendations from the 2019 Canadian guidelines for physical activity throughout pregnancy are:

1: All women without contraindications should be physically active throughout pregnancy.

2: Pregnant women should accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity each week to achieve clinically meaningful health benefits and reductions in pregnancy complication.

3: Physical activity should be accumulated over a minimum of 3 days per week, however, being active every day is encouraged.

4: Pregnant women should incorporate a variety of aerobic and resistance training.

5: Pelvic Floor muscle training may be performed on a daily basis to reduce the risk of urinary incontinence. Instruction on the proper technique is recommended to obtain optimal benefits.

6: Pregnant woman who experience light-headedness, nausea or feel unwell when they exercise flat on their back should change and avoid this position.

 

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Peak PhysioExercising while Pregnant.

10 Thing’s You Didn’t Know About Tennis Elbow

10 things you didn’t know about Tennis Elbow

  1. The condition was initially described in 1873. The name “lawn tennis elbow” first came into use for the condition in 1882.
  2. Around 2 % of the population aged 30-50 will present with these symptoms.
  3. It is not just tennis players, Tennis Elbow is also known as Lateral Epicondylitis or Lateral Elbow Tendinopathy
  4. Our lateral elbow anatomy is made up of a number of components, the key component we have to assess when looking at Tennis elbow is our common wrist extensors. They create a broad tendon that inserts on the outside of the lower part of the humerus.
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Peak Physio10 Thing’s You Didn’t Know About Tennis Elbow
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Knee Osteoarthritis: Do I need an operation?

What Is Osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis, commonly known as wear-and-tear, is a condition in which the natural cushioning between joints, the cartilage, becomes worn. When this happens, the bones of the joints rub more closely against one another with less of the shock-absorbing benefits of cartilage. The rubbing results in pain, swelling, stiffness, decreased mobility and, sometimes, the formation of bone spurs.

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Peak PhysioKnee Osteoarthritis: Do I need an operation?
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Why Does Everyone Keep Telling Me To Do Pilates? Here’s Why!

German-born Joseph Pilates invented the classical pilates method while working to rehabilitate soldiers badly injured in war. He used resistance devices attached to beds to allow bed ridden patients to exercise their muscles. He only wrote one book on his technique before he died. Since the passing of Joseph Pilates, the techniques have been modified and enhanced. The principles have been refined to reflect current understanding of anatomy, physiology and kinesiology.

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EoinWhy Does Everyone Keep Telling Me To Do Pilates? Here’s Why!
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What is Yoga All About & How Can It Help You?

Why practice Yoga?

Through the practice of yoga, we become aware of our postural holding patterns, our weaknesses and our imbalances. Some of these things can lead to pain and injury. With awareness, we can learn how to balance the muscular and skeletal systems of the body, create strength and flexibility and correct postural dysfunctions before they become troublesome.

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EoinWhat is Yoga All About & How Can It Help You?
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“I can’t do yoga, I’m not flexible.”

 

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This is one of the most common thoughts when considering trying out yoga classes and one of the most untrue. If your flexibility is lacking, then you’re exactly the person who SHOULD be doing yoga. The ability to contort yourself into wild and wonderful postures is not a pre-requisite for either participating in or enjoying a yoga class. In fact, contrary to popular belief, complicated, twisty, and extreme postures are not the majority in yoga. Yoga is for everyone, and everyone can do it.

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Eoin“I can’t do yoga, I’m not flexible.”